How To Remove A Moen Tub Spout

How To Remove A Moen Tub Spout

Every now and again, a tub spout replacement or repair might be in order. So, in order to install a new one or address problems hidden by the body of the spout. In some cases, removing the tub spout might not be as easy as one, two, three. Or, maybe the fixture will come off easily, but you have absolutely no idea where to start.

Either way, we’re here to help. If you need a bit of guidance on tackling your Moen tub spout, continue reading to learn more!

How Are Moen Tub Spouts Held In Place?

Moen 3801 Tub Spout with Diverter, 1/2-Inch Slip-fit CC Connection, Chrome

Moen designs tub spouts in two different ways: CC and IPS. CC tub spouts are a type of slip-fit tub spout. They slide directly onto the exposed plumbing, then are held in place by a small hex screw in the underside of the spout. Usually, these tub spouts fit onto a ½ inch copper pipe

Moen’s IPS tub spouts are a kind of threaded tub spout. They thread directly onto the exposed piece of pipe protruding from the wall, and there’s no hex screw holding it in place. Because Moen only has two different configurations, removing the spout should be a reasonably straightforward task. 

If you’re not sure what kind of tub spout it is, look on the underside of the spout for a screw. The screw is in an awkward position, so you might have to lay on your back in the tub to look for one. Or, use your fingers to feel for a screw hole in the underside of the spout. 

How To Remove A Moen Tub Spout

Removing a Moen tub spout, whether it’s a CC spout or an IPS spout, is pretty straightforward. It should only take a few minutes, providing the fixture isn’t bound by corrosion or mineral deposits. If it is, no worries – we’ll guide you through removing stubborn tub spouts later on. 

Bathtub Spout Removal

As with nearly any plumbing project, make sure you turn off the water supply to the tub. If you don’t (and you decide to lay on your back in the tub to remove the spout), you might end up on the receiving end of a sudden shower. 

Removing A Moen IPS Tub Spout

You shouldn’t need any special tools to remove a threaded (IPS) Moen tub spout. The spout itself threads directly onto the exposed plumbing. To remove this type of tub spout, unthread it by turning it counterclockwise. 

If you can’t get a good grip on the spout, use an adjustable wrench or strap wrench to hold the fixture firmly. Use a cloth underneath the wrench to cover and protect the finish. If it doesn’t give pretty easily, there might be corrosion or mineral deposits. 

Don’t force it, as you might damage the plumbing. Instead, jump down to the troubleshooting section. 

Removing A Moen CC Tub Spout

On the other hand, if you have a Moen slip-fit tub spout, you’ll need a 5/32-inch hex wrench. Find a comfortable position to access the hex screw. You could reach underneath the tap and remove the screw or lay on your back in the tub to access the screw. 

Either way, use the hex wrench to loosen the screw. Once you loosen it, you can use your hand to finish turning the screw. Remove it completely, then set it aside. Pull the tub spout straight out, sliding it off the pipe. 

Again, if there seems to be resistance, don’t force it. Instead, refer to our troubleshooting section. 

How Do You Remove A Stubborn Tub Spout?

Sometimes, the tub spout might be firmly fixed in place. The worst thing you can do in these scenarios is use brute force to yank the tub spout off the pipe. This is a great way to damage the plumbing. Unless you’re remodeling the entire bathroom or don’t mind moving the shower wall to fix broken plumbing, we’d recommend taking a different approach. 

Remove A Stubborn Tub Spout

The best method for tackling stubborn tub spouts depends on the type of tub spout you’re dealing with. For example, applying heat to a stuck slip-fit tub spout can be ideal for removing the stubborn fixture. On the flip side, a set screw complicates things. WD-40 may do the trick for stuck screw-in tub spouts.

Or, perhaps the tub spout spins freely on the pipe. It doesn’t stay fixed in place and instead rotates freely on its axis. In that case, the threads within the tub spout or the pipe’s threaded adapter are likely stripped. 

Corroded tub spouts or those covered in mineral deposits call for a slightly different approach. You’ll need to break the bond fixing the spout in place before you can remove it. Vinegar is a great way to deal with mineral deposits, while a penetrating oil is probably necessary for corroded situations.

For an in-depth guide on tackling stubborn tub faucets that simply won’t budge, visit our article dedicated to this very topic. If you work best with a detailed guide instead of loose guidance, visit the article for a bit more help, as we walk you through each step, each method hinging on the problem at hand.